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Construct 3

Documentation

Projects

Published 15 Aug, 2017
1,646 words
~7-11 mins

A project is a complete game or app made in Construct. Projects contain every element making up the game, ranging from events to sound files. An overview of the project is shown in the Project Bar where elements can be added, renamed, removed and arranged in to folders for organisation. See Project structure for a summary of the elements making up a project. The rest of this manual section goes in to more detail about each part of a project.

Projects can be opened, closed and exported from the main menu. See also Saving and sharing projects and Testing and publishing. It is recommended to follow some best practices while working on projects.

Project properties

The properties for a project can be edited in the Properties Bar after selecting the name of the project in the Project Bar, or using the Project properties shortcut in Layout Properties.

The Name, Author and Description properties are used for some of the export options, so be sure to fill them out accurately for any important projects.

Name

The name or title of the project.

Version

The version of the project, which conventionally is four numbers in descending importance (e.g. 1.0.0.0), where the first number is the major version and the last number is the revision number. This is also used by several exporters to assign the version to your published app. It is good practice to increment this each time you export your project.

Description

A sentence or two giving a short summary of the project. Several exporters use this as the description for your published app.

ID

An ID uniquely identifying your application. This should be in reverse domain format, such as com.mycompany.mygame. Some exporters use this as the ID for your exported app, so try to ensure it will be unique.

Author

The name of the individual or organisation developing the project.

Email

A support or contact email address for the project. Some exporters use this to fill out the Email field of the published app.

Website

A link to the author's website or other related web address. Your site should be hosted securely (with https://). Some exporters use this to fill out the Website field of the published app.

Background color

If the viewport does not cover the whole screen, e.g. when using letterbox mode, this is the color of the bars that appear at the sides.

Splash color

When run as a web app, this is the background color of the splash screen which appears when the web app is first launched.

Use theme color

Check to enable the Theme color property, allowing to override the default browser color scheme.

Theme color

On some platforms, the theme color is used to tint the browser or OS color scheme, such as the address bar, app caption, or status bar. If Use theme color is disabled the system defaults will be used, otherwise the theme color will be applied instead.

First layout

Select which layout is the first to appear when the project is exported. When previewing in the editor usually a specific layout is previewed, selecting Preview project will also preview from this layout.

Use loader layout

Use First layout as a special layout which shows while the rest of the layout is loading. The loadingprogress system expression returns the current progress from 0 to 1 (e.g. 0.5 for half completed). For more information, see the tutorial how to make a custom loading screen.

Loader style Paid plans only

Change the default loader which is shown while the game is loading, or while the loader layout is itself still loading. Note the Free edition can only use the Construct 3 splash style. See the tutorial how to make a custom loading screen for more information.

Preload sounds

Whether to download and decode sounds before the game can start. If enabled, then sounds will be downloaded while the loading bar is showing. If disabled then sounds will be downloaded on-demand as the game runs, which can add a delay on the first time they are played, but it also means there is less to download before the game can start. Note this option does not preload music, which will still be streamed as the game runs.

Viewport size

The size, in pixels, of the view area in to the game. A dashed line indicating the window size appears in the Layout View. The viewport aspect ratio is also displayed underneath to help you easily identify which aspect ratio your project is using.

Fullscreen mode

This determines how to fill the available window or screen space with the viewport. By default it uses Letterbox scale, which stretches the viewport to fill all available space, using black bars down the sides to preserve the aspect ratio. There are several variations; for more information see the tutorial on supporting multiple screen sizes.

Fullscreen quality

This only applies when the viewport is being stretched (i.e. Fullscreen mode is not Off). High quality mode renders at the full resolution of the displayed size. Low quality mode first renders at the project viewport size, and then simply stretches the result to fill the screen. Low quality mode often improves performance on low-end systems and is often suitable for retro-style pixellated games with Point sampling. However note that text, downscaled sprites and effects will appear with better detail in high quality mode.

Orientations

Whether to lock the orientation on mobile devices. Any allows the display to switch between portrait and landscape automatically; choosing either portrait or landscape will attempt to lock the orientation to prevent it changing. This is applied when publishing an app, but for web exports note that not all browsers or platforms support orientation locking or have limitations on when it can apply. In some browsers it must be in fullscreen mode (using the Browser object's Request fullscreen action) before orientation lock takes effect.

Sampling

Choose between linear (smooth) and point (pixellated) sampling when resizing images. Linear is recommended for modern games with hi-res graphics, and point is better suited to retro games with blocky pixel art.

Pixel rounding

By default objects can be drawn at sub-pixel positions, e.g. (100.3, 200.8). If Sampling is set to Linear, this can make fine pixel art appear blurry. If Pixel rounding is enabled,objects round their position to a whole number before drawing, e.g. (100, 201). This prevents any blurring, and can also prevent "seams" appearing on grids of objects. Note this does not affect their actual X and Y co-ordinates, which can still be between pixels - it only affects where they are drawn on the screen.

Runtime

Switch between the legacy C2 runtime, or the modern C3 runtime. For more information see The C3 runtime.

GPU preference

On devices with multiple GPUs, the type of GPU to prefer. The most common multi-GPU case is laptops that contain a weak low-power integrated GPU (designed to maximize battery life) and a powerful discrete GPU (designed to maximize performance). This setting controls the preferred GPU on such devices.

Downscaling quality

Adjusts the tradeoff between rendering quality and memory use when resizing images to smaller than their original size (downscaling). The options are:

  • Low quality: mipmaps are disabled (reducing memory use), but downscaled sprites may appear blocky or pixellated. This mode is not recommended for most games, since disabling mipmaps can reduce performance.

  • Medium quality: mipmaps are enabled. Downscaling sprites generally looks better.

  • High quality: mipmaps are enabled and the spritesheet after export pads out all images to power-of-two sizes. This can significantly increase memory use, but can resolve two minor rendering issues: light fringing that can sometimes occur along the borders of downscaled objects, or a quality change in the last frame of an animation. Do not use this mode unless a rendering artefact is specifically observed and selecting this mode can be observed to resolve it: the increased memory usage can be very significant, and is not a cost that should be added for no reason. For more information see Memory usage.

Preview effects

Whether or not to display effects and blend modes in the Layout View. If enabled, WebGL must also be enabled for the effects to appear. If disabled, WebGL effects are not rendered in the editor, and all objects are drawn as if they have the Normal blend mode.

Pause on unfocus

If enabled, the preview will pause when the browser window loses focus, e.g. when switching back to work in Construct. This can be useful for certain workflows, or to prevent the project distracting you as you work. If disabled the preview will continue to run even without focus, but note switching to another browser tab or minimising the preview window will still pause (as it does with published projects).

Bundle addons Paid plans only

If enabled, all third-party addons that the project uses will be bundled with the project file when saved. This allows the project to be opened anywhere, such as on another system where the addons have not been pre-installed. This makes it more convenient to move projects using third-party addons between different devices. Note that addons can opt out of bundling; you will be notified when enabling this option if any addons cannot be bundled with the project. Bundled addons always use the version of the addon that was installed when they are saved. They can however be updated if the installed addon is a newer version via the View used addons dialog.