Construct 2/3 Companies?

  • I perceive Construct 2/3 as an engine for Indie developers or mini studio developers. Are there any bigger companies using Construct 2/3 to make games?

  • I doubt any big companies would use C2/C3 to make their games. Maybe for prototyping, but definitely not for production.

  • Big companies tend to have their own codebase, and in many cases their own in-house game engine, for production , with each programmer owning a very small portion. Construct isn’t a good fit for this approach.

  • We've sold C2 to Zynga and King in pretty good numbers to name a couple. Don't think they have published games with C2, so am guessing they are using it for internal prototyping.

  • Miniclip also have a few games with c2

  • Thanks for all the amazing answers, even one from a scirra founder himself, wow! It is an honor indeed and it could be exhilarating if more companies could be mentioned even for the sake of having a look at them and what they do being "intertwined with" Construct, would it also be too much if I wanted to know which https://www.miniclip.com/ have actually been "Constructed"? Thanks in advance!

  • Whilst it's unlikely that you'll ever see a company outright endorsing any software, they will often make use of contractors, freelancers and creative agencies that do.

    In terms of big game devs - Insomniac Games, the creators of Spyro, Ratchet and Clank, and the upcoming PS4 Spider-Man game, have made prototypes in Construct.

    In terms of creatives, I'm not as certain on this (so I won't name them) - but I believe a colleague made use of Construct as a Flash/Animate replacement for interactive content for one of UKs largest and most famous animation houses.

    In terms of big corporates, I use Construct to produce prototypes and finished drafts - the largest company being a multinational that ranks very high on the top 10 of the Forbes Global 500; though as with all corporate clients, this was for a very isolated (though nontheless brand-named) division.

  • You would need to define "bigger company." This is also hard to answer, because a lot of what are (traditionally) bigger companies don't always post publically what they use.

    You also don't have the best few of how it is used. For example, I know lots who use Construct for prototyping. Does that count?

    Point is, it is a tough question. I would say, yes, there are very large companies around the world using Construct. You can see plenty in the forums, but there are also a lot in the shadows who won't come out and say they use it.

  • Whilst it's unlikely that you'll ever see a company outright endorsing any software, they will often make use of contractors, freelancers and creative agencies that do.

    In terms of big game devs - Insomniac Games, the creators of Spyro, Ratchet and Clank, and the upcoming PS4 Spider-Man game, have made prototypes in Construct.

    In terms of creatives, I'm not as certain on this (so I won't name them) - but I believe a colleague made use of Construct as a Flash/Animate replacement for interactive content for one of UKs largest and most famous animation houses.

    In terms of big corporates, I use Construct to produce prototypes and finished drafts - the largest company being a multinational that ranks very high on the top 10 of the Forbes Global 500; though as with all corporate clients, this was for a very isolated (though nontheless brand-named) division.

    This.

    Demo's in hours rather than days.

    Creatives in days rather than weeks.

  • If someone asked me a year ago if I thought C2/3 would be a valuable tool for a developer for profit I'd of told them no.

    But... now I'm starting to see a different angle.

    This day and age, interactive media is still a big deal. From "games" on newgrounds to minigames on HTML5 websites, honestly with the quick efficiency to produce interactive web pages I'm surprised marketers and casinos haven't picked up on this.

    Maybe I'm missing something on the "why hasn't this caught on" train, but I can see the potential now. I've been looking at companies (mainly casinos) who still utilize flash for animations on kiosks, slots, and other touch screen interfaces. One guy who ran his business for 20 years wants to get away from flash (and iOS), I work for his brother but it's so hard to get a hold of this guy (He's a millionare, parties a lot for a 50 year old dude)... maybe the kiosks aren't designed to read HTML5, but with how fast web has grown it's become a common interface for just near everything.

    As for marketing, imagine cranking out webpages, prototyping how the pages look. In matter of a couple hours I've made some pretty spiffy, professional looking web pages in C2 much faster than trial and error with all Front End languages you normally get. I dare call it "cheating" but in the business world there is no cheating if it increases productivity. A company like Disney or Funimation could really benefit for having people design games for all their properties, kids could play these games online.

    Imagine playing a point and click game of your favorite cartoon, say Stephen Universe? Maybe a fun online board game for the Walking Dead? Or advertise a new restaurant with tons of images and requires hours and hours of formatting and placement you can do in a matter of minutes?

    I've been checking indeed using HTML5 as a tag and it's mostly just Front End stuff, nothing to do with creating games or the like. It doesn't have to be strictly videogames, could be for anything really.

  • Um, what's up with this company?

    Why is it showing Tom as being banned?

  • Um, what's up with this company?

    Why is it showing Tom as being banned?

    lol I think he got hacked. His new nickname is afeba4115aed4ea2bc024d34bb854eee

  • Try Construct 3

    Develop games in your browser. Powerful, performant & highly capable.

    Try Now Construct 3 users don't see these ads
  • At the last company I worked for we used Construct 2 near exclusively for creating B2B HTML5 games. Initially I was sceptical about using Construct over a bespoke JavaScript solution or a framework like Phaser. I was very glad to be proven wrong - over a three year period we produced around sixty titles and prototyped many more. I don't believe we would have come anywhere near to that output with other tools. In fact, we could have reached a much higher total catalogue had we capitalised upon the advantages to the pipeline that Construct offered earlier on in our production process.

    The sheer speed with which you can prototype a concept was invaluable. Often we would skip a pen and paper concepting stage and skip straight to producing a demo in C2 - the time difference was negligible and at the end of it we had something we could actually play. If approved, the prototype could be worked on directly by the coders and artists to produce the final product - no work thrown away. The ability to modify the tool with JS-based plug-ins and behaviours made it easy to adapt to our in-house systems.

    The fact that C2 could be learned quickly and easily by all team members meant that everyone was speaking a common language, improving communication about the project and giving us an immense amount of flexibility in how we assigned tasks.

    Obviously Construct isn't going to be suitable for all types of games/studios. I can see it being problematic for games with large teams where many people need simultaneous access to different parts of the project; graphically intense/processor heavy games may suffer. However, for a range of HTML5 and mobile products Construct is certainly a viable, and in many scenarios optimal, tool - sadly often overlooked in favour of more expensive or less flexible options.

  • Back sorry - my fault was a bug!

  • mekonbekon

    I think that's a great use for Construct 2. Small little promotional games. If you want to engage customers and maybe run some competitions for a product launch etc.

    Where I've worked we have on occasions had requests for small games for promo purposes, or even small interactive banners. As customers mostly wanted to show off products in 3D where they could rotate and view products we had to direct them elsewhere to other solutions or outsource the work. (2D is just not fancy enough). I've tried using Construct + Q3D but it's way to clunky to use in Construct due to the lack of a 3D viewport.

    My own main project at the moment is kind of halted because of the same reason, so working on other games at the moment. I wanted to do something similar to this one but for mobile: https://playcanv.as/p/BAuoCOx6/

    I did this little test using Construct 2, and Q3D a while back, http://tunepunk.com/share/archer/ just to see if it could be done in Construct and it certainly can, but editing levels is a pain without a proper viewport. Or you have to keep your game very simple without much detail in your levels.

    It's a double edged sword. No good 3D engine has event sheets for super fast prototyping and games & Construct doesn't have good support for 3D. <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_e_confused.gif" alt=":?" title="Confused">

    Hopefully some time in the future Construct will support (even if very simple) 3D, but until then... No 3D games for me.

Jump to:
Active Users
There are 1 visitors browsing this topic (0 users and 1 guests)