Any really profitable games made with construct 2?

  • I've finally decided to thoroughly check construct 2 (bought it 7 months ago), and it's awesome!

    Thing is, I've yet to see a REALLY successful game in the play store/app store. By successful I mean generates enough revenue for a pretty decent living, Maybe even enough to focus on games rather than work.

    Is there any game like this? reason I'm asking is that we open a mobile game division in our company, and I'm looking at several frameworks (unity 2d, starling, cocoonjs+pixijs and construct 2). We have a massive user base to publish the game to, so marketing is not an issue.

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  • Try to contact Our Darker Purpose team, i think they made nice money on steam.

  • trueicecold

    the issue is that professional developers are using Unity. Why? Because they will get good exporters, ads etc. now.Without waiting months for CocoonJS, Crosswalk, Android L, iOS 8, Whatever 9

    of course it is possible to make profitable games, but serious developers know about Construct 2 weak points

  • Thing is, I've yet to see a REALLY successful C2 game in the play store/app store.

    I think this was discussed a few time here, so here goes my opinion.

    I think the misconception is that one always think that a game engine play key success factor in getting successful. However, it is actually not related, it depends on luck and "what" actually published by C2 user. Let's think about it, rather than keep looking for whether C2 games has made it out there, why not challenge ourselves to be "The First One" to be successful. If we keep looking this way, and given up just because no user made it big with C2, it's like a dog chasing it's tail.

    Engine will always be an engine, being creative and appealing is what we should be aiming for. In the end, C2 is just a tool.

    Analogy: Heck, I dont think a success factor of a novel is determined by the tools used by the writer, it can be notepad, ms word, or just pencil and paper, but CREATIVITY IS.

  • As DuckfaceNinja said the engine is just a tool and with C2 you can make great games. The problem is that easy engines like C2 mostly attracts first time developers lacking the experience needed to make a really successful game. That is why we see alot of bad games posted here. But we all have to start somewhere. Developers that have studied game design and coding are usually using other more advanced engines.

    So if you are talented and know how to make best use of C2 you are surely able to make a really successful game. I've seen a few developers here who are actually getting there and are working on high polished games.

    For example. You could easely make an identical game like flappy bird, angry birds and other hit games just as polished as the original. So it is clearly not the engines fault you don't see a successful C2 game on the major platforms.

    And to make a really successful game you have to be lucky and the C2 developers aren't that many yet. So if we all keep working hard I promise you'll see a C2 game in the toplist on iOS, Android and Steam pretty soon

  • Super Ubie Land, Mortar Melon, Our Darker Purpose (On Steam passing Greenlight is a huge achievement).

    Coming soon: Airscape & The Next Penelope.

    Quite a few other great games, but just needs some luck.

  • Thanks a lot for the input everyone, while the event system of C2 looks nothing short than amazing (still has its own quirks though), me being a hardcore developer (c#/web/as3) developer, I've decided to keep testing out Starling and Unity 2D for my company for now. On the other hand, I'm tinkering with my own little game using C2

    Much appreciated!

  • C2 is an engine to develop games, you need an original idea even simple.

    Read my tutorial

    https://www.scirra.com/tutorials/1007/promote-a-game-and-the-hard-way-to-make-you-hear

  • Analogy: Heck, I dont think a success factor of a novel is determined by the tools used by the writer, it can be notepad, ms word, or just pencil and paper, but CREATIVITY IS.

    This. As someone who has written several manuscripts, and published one, I can tell you that it all boils down to creativity (and good grammar, of course:P). As long as the tool is capable, and the person using it knows what he/she is doing, there shouldn't be a problem. I think people tend to get a case of grassisgreeneritis, and want to hop platforms just because "someone did something cool over there, I can too" and then jumps ship every time something new comes out. Those are the people that never finish anything. Just my opinion, of course.

  • Hi

    I just would like to know why you change Ludei compiler in your Star Nomad?

  • Hi

    I just would like to know why you change Ludei compiler in your Star Nomad?

    I posted this in another thread in regards to Scirra depreciating CocoonJS:

  • I have nothing against C2, but I switched to Unity primarily because of two reasons:

    • Industry standard. I can have my game 'fail' and probably get a decent job with a company working on another game because Unity is more standardized.
    • Export. This is the issue mentioned by someone else. HTML5/web is not a profitable platform right now, and C2 export options are all third-party plugins. If you want to see C2 get some real adoption, Scirra must produce and maintain their own exporters, just like Unity does. Trying to export to mobile in C2 is a bunch of headaches where Scirra blames the plugin developers and the plugin developers blame Scirra.
  • Excal : There is a profitable market of html5 browser games actually. Although small, it is growing and should slowly replace the flash one. It is not a market where you can create anything you'd like though. Anyway, I made a decent part of my income this year with html5 games, without investing much time and effort.

    However, quite clearly: wrapped games tend to perform poorly. When you compare it to the crazy performances of Unity or some framework like cocos, the difference is astonishing! Not only that, but with a tool like unity in particular, you do get a lot of flexibility as far as your possibilities are concerned.

  • Excal Your point #1 is really good, it's something most of us wouldn't have considered.

    Unity is the industry standard and I see lots of job offers requiring expertise with it. It's a game engine that is used widely, from solo indie devs to big AAA companies.

    #2 isn't so bad anymore, with Intel XDK for Android & Ejecta for iOS.

    Valerien Performance isn't too bad either, but certainly not as efficient as raw C++ or Objective C.

    If I had my time again, I would definitely use Game Maker engine instead of C2, its more suited for my needs, which is primarily 2D mobiles. At the time, Unity did not have a good 2D option. Saying that, currently with XDK, I am satisfied on Android.

    100% for PC/MAC, C2 isn't the limiting option for 2D games reaching success.

  • >

    > Analogy: Heck, I dont think a success factor of a novel is determined by the tools used by the writer, it can be notepad, ms word, or just pencil and paper, but CREATIVITY IS.

    >

    This. As someone who has written several manuscripts, and published one, I can tell you that it all boils down to creativity (and good grammar, of course:P). As long as the tool is capable, and the person using it knows what he/she is doing, there shouldn't be a problem. I think people tend to get a case of grassisgreeneritis, and want to hop platforms just because "someone did something cool over there, I can too" and then jumps ship every time something new comes out. Those are the people that never finish anything. Just my opinion, of course.

    I completely agree. While it can be said some tools have limitations that stifle creativity to a degree (for example, if you couldn't include audio but were making Piano Simulator 2015...), the main limitations when it comes to game design are creativity, understanding of game mechanics, and patience. Patience is a big one, because you won't make the world's most amazing game overnight. Patience also entails understanding, because if you like your game, there's certain to be 50% of people that probably won't and you can't please everybody. They might bitterly insult your game, but just ignore them; if there's no helpful criticism, then it isn't beneficial to take on-board.

    Another important quality I find helpful is OPTIMISM! You might tell friends and family you're making a game where ____ happens, with lots of graphics and sound you'd paid a composer to create, and they'll bring out the 'You should spend your time doing something else, what's the chance your game will make something of itself?' rhetorical question. The point is, if you love what you're doing and aren't purely doing it for money, then WHO CARES?! Do what you like to, and when the game is created you can look back at the process and be grateful you were able to participate in such a ride. Not many (on a global scale) attempt it.

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