Order to do thinks to develop my game.

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  • Hello

    I started to use construct 3 not so along ago and it blow my mind how easy is to make a 2d platform game.

    I have the story ready type of 2d platform game I want to make and even the levels for it. The story behind it I have for almost 5 years and I was just looking for the right tool to make it and I think I found it in the the face of construct 3 cause I really dislike code in any form.

    1) I want to make a rage type difficult platform game but with some nice humor in it

    2)I want to make it single room for every level of the game

    3) I believe I can find assets for graphics music and sound through the internet

    My question is where do I start and how do i proceed thinks without anxiety hits me. Cause I got so excited the other day that my head hurt :)

    The later problem would be is that i want high quality graphics cause I also want it to put it on Steam. There are a lot of sites with assets out there but the tile maps I found are all low quality which ones do they have high quality like the high quality chars you send us for free?

    Thanks in advance. I hope you are all healthy in these times we all live.

  • As far as anxiety goes, try Trello for planning your game out :)

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  • I posted this for someone on the construct subreddit, who was looking for a "general process" for making a game. It's a little long but hopefully helpful.

    1) Create the core mechanics first with placeholder art in a test layout. Don't try to create any real levels yet. Ask, what is the player doing 90% of the time? If it's a platformer then that would be running/jumping around a test level. If it's an action game then that would be combat, etc. After this stage you'll basically have a toy to play with.

    2) Then allow the player to accomplish the goals of a single test layout. It's important that you STILL don't create any "real" levels yet because you want to make sure your events are working correctly before worrying about the details of the actual levels. If you're a beginner, I would encourage you to design each level to have the same goal. In the first Mario game for example, 99% of levels is just to reach the end. That way you can create a system that can be re-used across all your levels.

    3) Now create the challenges the player will face. If it's a platformer then make it so the player can fall down pits, get damaged by spikes, get hit by enemies, etc. Still do this in a test level. During this make it so the player can lose and re-play.

    (Milestone: Core Loop) Those steps may take from a few days or months. Just depends on your skill level and how complicated your game is. After those things you'll basically have the "core loop" finished. The player can do the main things they can do, have challenges to face off against, and can win and lose. If you need a HUD or menus to get to this point, then go ahead and do it in a minimal fashion just to make everything work. It's important that all of this is done with placeholder art and definitely don't add any sound yet!

    --------------------------------------------------------

    4) Next you can add any supporting systems. Such as transitioning from level to level, collecting resources, power-ups, upgrades, crafting, etc. This will vary tremendously depending upon the kind of game you're making.

    5) NOW you can start creating all your real levels and the flow between them. At this time you may also want to create the game's ending, whatever happens after they beat the final level. Create the title screen and any other menus like options, etc. Right now would also be a good time to add the ability to save the player's progress and be able to load it from the title screen.

    (Milestone: Alpha) Remember, you did all of that with placeholder art and no sound. But you're entire game functions like it's suppose to. This milestone is called alpha.

    --------------------------------------------------------

    6) Now you can start creating / adding in all of your finalized art / animation / effects. This will take a really long time to tweak and make it "look right".

    7) Then you can start creating / adding in all your finalized sound / music. This also takes a long time to tweak and get it to "sound just right".

    8) After that you can pass through all of your content and fix bugs, balance your mechanics such as tweaking damage numbers, health points, speed values, pacing of each level. Then add polish to your art such as adding little effects like dust particles, atmospheric effects, making things shine and sparkle, etc.

    9) At this point your game is pretty much finished. The vast majority of what you'll be doing is testing it, fixing bugs, adjusting the balance, getting feedback from other people, etc.

    (Milestone: Gold) Once you feel really good about the entire game and you want to call it complete then you've reached the milestone called "going gold".

    --------------------------------------------------------

    10) I bet you thought you were done. But there's more! Now you must complete a few steps related to "publishing". You have to figure out how you're going to package and distribute your game. You need to create icons, splash screens, write descriptions, instructions on controls and installation. Are you just going to wrap up your game in a zip file? Maybe you want an installer to make it look a little more professional. Are you just going to email it to your friends? Host it on itch.io? Release on Steam?

    (Milestone: Finished Game) Once you've worked through ALL of that........ Congratulations you've just completed your first game.

  • Fib Great info, perhaps also post it as a Construct tutorial (even just as is would be great, but with a few pictures, would be really nice.)

  • Great tips by Fib I think.

    If you're new to this you can always check a lot of examples of existing game types, so you can have an idea on how you can set up the game, but that's from a technical point of view of course, and not timeline wise. Generally I iterate through the process, start with some basics, make sure all the base mechanics are there, and then iterate back again to tweak everything until I have it exactly as I want it.

    youtube.com/channel/UCZ6QjvqEs9dR2miRnfFqIpQ

    hope this helps!

  • Thank you all for your replies

    Fib. That is exactly the way I think to proceed.

    I will keep you all informed of how it is going and maybe ask for some more tips :).

    Thanks again.

  • I posted this for someone on the construct subreddit, who was looking for a "general process" for making a game. It's a little long but hopefully helpful.

    1) Create the core mechanics first with placeholder art in a test layout. Don't try to create any real levels yet. Ask, what is the player doing 90% of the time? If it's a platformer then that would be running/jumping around a test level. If it's an action game then that would be combat, etc. After this stage you'll basically have a toy to play with.

    2) Then allow the player to accomplish the goals of a single test layout. It's important that you STILL don't create any "real" levels yet because you want to make sure your events are working correctly before worrying about the details of the actual levels. If you're a beginner, I would encourage you to design each level to have the same goal. In the first Mario game for example, 99% of levels is just to reach the end. That way you can create a system that can be re-used across all your levels.

    3) Now create the challenges the player will face. If it's a platformer then make it so the player can fall down pits, get damaged by spikes, get hit by enemies, etc. Still do this in a test level. During this make it so the player can lose and re-play.

    (Milestone: Core Loop) Those steps may take from a few days or months. Just depends on your skill level and how complicated your game is. After those things you'll basically have the "core loop" finished. The player can do the main things they can do, have challenges to face off against, and can win and lose. If you need a HUD or menus to get to this point, then go ahead and do it in a minimal fashion just to make everything work. It's important that all of this is done with placeholder art and definitely don't add any sound yet!

    --------------------------------------------------------

    4) Next you can add any supporting systems. Such as transitioning from level to level, collecting resources, power-ups, upgrades, crafting, etc. This will vary tremendously depending upon the kind of game you're making.

    5) NOW you can start creating all your real levels and the flow between them. At this time you may also want to create the game's ending, whatever happens after they beat the final level. Create the title screen and any other menus like options, etc. Right now would also be a good time to add the ability to save the player's progress and be able to load it from the title screen.

    (Milestone: Alpha) Remember, you did all of that with placeholder art and no sound. But you're entire game functions like it's suppose to. This milestone is called alpha.

    --------------------------------------------------------

    6) Now you can start creating / adding in all of your finalized art / animation / effects. This will take a really long time to tweak and make it "look right".

    7) Then you can start creating / adding in all your finalized sound / music. This also takes a long time to tweak and get it to "sound just right".

    8) After that you can pass through all of your content and fix bugs, balance your mechanics such as tweaking damage numbers, health points, speed values, pacing of each level. Then add polish to your art such as adding little effects like dust particles, atmospheric effects, making things shine and sparkle, etc.

    9) At this point your game is pretty much finished. The vast majority of what you'll be doing is testing it, fixing bugs, adjusting the balance, getting feedback from other people, etc.

    (Milestone: Gold) Once you feel really good about the entire game and you want to call it complete then you've reached the milestone called "going gold".

    --------------------------------------------------------

    10) I bet you thought you were done. But there's more! Now you must complete a few steps related to "publishing". You have to figure out how you're going to package and distribute your game. You need to create icons, splash screens, write descriptions, instructions on controls and installation. Are you just going to wrap up your game in a zip file? Maybe you want an installer to make it look a little more professional. Are you just going to email it to your friends? Host it on itch.io? Release on Steam?

    (Milestone: Finished Game) Once you've worked through ALL of that........ Congratulations you've just completed your first game.

    Thanks.

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