Is anyone Making Money with Construct 3 on a day to day basis?

  • What I mean is it not just possible but is anyone doing game programing via construct 3 for a living?

    Are you making enough by publishing games via construct to replace your income?

    Say 3,000 a month?

    Also what platforms are you exporting to to do this?

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  • I remember a month that I got € 3

  • Not sure if he's still around but years ago there was a guy claiming to be making a living off it. His methods were a bit 'dodgy' which is why I never looked into them.

    Basically, he would buy C2 games off of some trading website for little or nothing, reskin them and then, resell them on the same site. He also wrote a book on how to do it and was trying to sell it here on the forums.

    Whether that worked and was profitable or not is another question.

  • Yes, its possible. But for me, not with publishing one game. I earn good money with accept offers to making games.

  • i also earned good money by making games for people.

  • Not yet...I plan on releasing (finally) my 1st game using C3 next month...as for my other games, nah, not making much at all (not enough to quit my 'regular' day job)

  • As I see it, making a living off creating any game using any engine (C3, Unreal, Unity, etc.) is entirely possible, even as a solo indy dev. I'm aware of one game that is pure HTML that the owner was claiming to make $750 a month off Google advertisements alone.

    Whether it's possible or not isn't the question. The proper question is HOW to make a living off any game.

    There are a number of approaches as to how to earn a living. Dwarf Forest went for years with two brothers making a living off of crowdfunding alone. It's now been accepted into Steam and will likely rocket beyond it's previous income.

    Placing your game on any host type service (Google Play, Steam, Epic, etc.) is probably a good idea but then, you get buried in the thousands of other games in those services. The two brothers from Dwarf Forest focused on one game for years and constantly added to and updated it before going for the Steam platform. Their approach was one product focused on one specific segment of the market.

    Other gaming companies go for the shotgun approach. Lots and lots of games that are quick and easy to develop with each one making a small income. Or, one game with lots of players making small incomes off of some of them. The CEO of World of Tanks once said he'd rather have a million players occasionally paying a few dollars rather than a hundred players paying every month. This strategy created a huge player-base that helped him advertise the game. The thing you have to worry about there is an old sales adage: A happy customer will tell a friend, an unhappy customer will tell 10 friends.

    In the world of gaming you either make loads of cheap, pink bubble gum and sell tons of it it for a few pennies each or, you make designer bubble gum in a pretty package and sell a lot less for a lot more.

    So, the first decision is, a focused approach to a limited market making money off all of them (subscriptions) or, a broad approach to a wide market and making a few bucks off of some of them (in game purchases).

    Regardless of how you make money, the key to any games success is multi-fold. Foremost, you need a game that entertains people. Most game dev's create a game for their own liking. What they forget is they aren't in the game-making business, they're in the entertainment business. You game needs to be entertaining. If it's not fun, people won't keep playing it.

    Nextly, it needs to be engaging. You don't want people completing the game in a few hours. They'll consider themselves to have won and will quickly look for another game to beat. The longer you entertain people, the better the odds of you earning an income.

    The BIGGEST key to any games success is marketing. And I don't just mean buying ads on Google. By that I mean getting the word out and in the proper channels. For example. Albion Online just went free to play. If you look at the Steam charts prior to f2p it had around 400-600 players. Two days after going f2p it had 10,000 players. Their marketing team blasted out press releases to all of the major game review sites prior to going f2p and many of them picked up on that story. As a result, Google News grabbed those stories and showed those news articles to people who are interested in gaming (like me). As a result, I saw it and I decided to go play (and subscribe for a month). There are gobs of ways to market your game for free. Journalists who write stories about gaming love it when their job is made easy by press releases. It means they don't have to go digging for a story.

    If you want your game to succeed you need to promote it. Mark Twain once said that the perfect place for a spider to build a web is in the doorway of a business that doesn't advertise. In today's flooded game market, that's even more true. It does no good to create a game if nobody knows that it exists.

    So, as I see it, those are a few of the things you have to consider when creating a game and making it profitable. It's more than just writing code. Construct is a great gaming engine with lots of possibilities and flexibility and the potential to make a living is definitely there. And the ability to create entertaining, captivating games is there.

    Creating the game though is only part of the equation.

  • And there's one more comment that needs to be made when considering writing any software, game or otherwise, profitable or not, and this is from someone who has a somewhat successful shareware product on the market (written in Delphi).

    Creating any piece of software to do what you want is relatively easy.

    Creating a piece of software that's idiot proof is almost impossible.

    In working on my next creation I've spent weeks on just the login and registration process trying to consider all of the things people can possibly put in text boxes that would cause issues. Don't ever assume that the end user will use the software exactly as you expect, because they won't.

  • Kinda curious if anyone has had any luck with Patreon, or similar services.

    Seems like it might be better than Kickstarter, or Gofundme.

    Especially if supporters are giving feedback.

  • Kinda curious if anyone has had any luck with Patreon, or similar services.

    Seems like it might be better than Kickstarter, or Gofundme.

    Especially if supporters are giving feedback.

    I tried this and I have lost all faith in humans. Once upon a time, I modded for a game. Over the years, I spent hundreds and hundreds of hours writing code in C#, plugging all that into Unity, creating 3D models, texturing, making videos, etc. Over 100,000 downloads of just one mod which was always in the top 30 out of 2,100+ mods in popularity. Thousands of downloads of other mods for the same game. All of the forum posts for the mod were linked to a Patreon account and the forum thread for the big mod had well over 100,000 views.

    My donations? $1.00 in Patreon + around $50.00 in PayPal donations.

    I've stopped modding because I'm of the opinion now that if you can't or don't somehow twist people's arm into 'donating' they won't. They'll go out and chuck $5.00 into a really crappy cup of coffee. Donate a stinking $1 willingly? Well yes, there are some games that have succeeded at that. They're few and far between. I'm personally not going to be that stupid any more. If I invest my time and energy creating entertainment for someone else (especially when it benefits another game company's bottom line) I expect to be compensated with more than just someone clicking a stoopid like button on a forum.

    My next attempt will be most likely a freemium model.

    (Can you tell I'm a tad salty about the topic of people donating for entertainment?)

    <--- the like button is there. Feel free to click it on these forums as I'm not selling anything yet.

  • The BIGGEST key to any games success is marketing. And I don't just mean buying ads on Google. By that I mean getting the word out and in the proper channels. For example. Albion Online just went free to play. If you look at the Steam charts prior to f2p it had around 400-600 players. Two days after going f2p it had 10,000 players. Their marketing team blasted out press releases to all of the major game review sites prior to going f2p and many of them picked up on that story. As a result, Google News grabbed those stories and showed those news articles to people who are interested in gaming (like me). As a result, I saw it and I decided to go play (and subscribe for a month). There are gobs of ways to market your game for free. Journalists who write stories about gaming love it when their job is made easy by press releases. It means they don't have to go digging for a story.

    Yep, this is the one that keeps me up at night. So many games getting put out there without any marketing strategy and then just getting lost.

    I'm currently applying for a government grant for exactly this reason. When I spoke to the person who organises the grants, they stated that it's a recognised issue among the peopel they support where developers know how to make good games, but are clueless with marketing as they're two very separate areas. Ideally, the grant money will allow me to hire a marketing person.

  • Somebody posted here a while back and I think he mentioned making $69,000 over 3 years with one game on google playstore.

    Players do not care what you use to make games, so when it comes to 2D whether it is Unity or Construct or something else makes little difference. No reason not to be able to make money with Construct games.

    I think Construct should be much better at/easier to use with something like CPMStar ads, and adsense if possible. I used to make $100+ per day with Flash games and CPMStar ads and Construct has absolutely zero support for that. The only way to do anything about it is finding your own way to pull it off, iFrames and such which is not ideal. This last paragraph is mostly to web/html 5 exports

  • Somebody posted here a while back and I think he mentioned making $69,000 over 3 years with one game on google playstore.

    Players do not care what you use to make games, so when it comes to 2D whether it is Unity or Construct or something else makes little difference. No reason not to be able to make money with Construct games.

    I think Construct should be much better at/easier to use with something like CPMStar ads, and adsense if possible. I used to make $100+ per day with Flash games and CPMStar ads and Construct has absolutely zero support for that. The only way to do anything about it is finding your own way to pull it off, iFrames and such which is not ideal. This last paragraph is mostly to web/html 5 exports

    I'm registered on cpmstar, but i can't found any api to display ingame-ads. I see only ads for websites?!

  • In game ads work only with Flash games, which is basically useless these days.

    Since web site ads are basically html, something could be worked out to add them to Construct games.

    You can do it right now if you use iFrame to display them, but there should be a better solution.

    And they do have separate mobile ads I think, you do not get access to those unless you sign up specifically for them.

  • With the future of Construct being very open now that 3's runtime has surpassed 2's, I'm personally optimistic for a shift from game engine to "experience engine" that truly embraces HTML5+.

    This is real blue sky optimism, but would open the engine up in ways suggested above.

    As an aside, Ashley and Tom recently hinted on a great game dev podcast that there was possibly a change coming to C3 this year that would reinvent how developers use the product.

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