How well does C2 work in a group project?

  • If I were to have.. lets say 2 or 3 people working on 1game. How well would that work?

    Can 2 people use C2 and develop the game at the same time? Is there some sort of system in place to merge the changes 2 people make(or something)?

  • Yes, use a system like subversion (or any type of tool of the like) in which you would store your saved file as folder.

    Also remember that if the game is aimed to be a commercial game, all members of the team need a license.

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  • Alright, thanks for the reply but to be more specific: Can 2 people edit the same .caproj file? Because it seems a bit weird that it's as simple as to just use SVN.

  • I don't know much, but I really doubt that 2 people can work on the same caproj at the same time.

  • Doesn't it seem kind of odd though that a game engine only allows 1 level designer to work at any given time?

  • The folder project files are xml (text) format.

    Using SVN or subversion, or any type of version control system software, the version control system software itself does the job of handling the modifications to the source files (in C2's case the .caproj and other files from the folder) and allow to two or more peoples to simultaneously work on the same file.

    Check the documentation of subversion to learn how to set it up and use it in team production environment.

  • That's very interesting! I didn't know that was possible.

  • Kyatric is right. The XML-based project format is designed to work nicely with source control systems like SVN. These allow multiple people to work on projects simultaneously, and then commit their work to the master copy (the server) as well as update to receive other people's changes. I've been meaning to write a tutorial on how to set it up...

  • Kyatric is right. The XML-based project format is designed to work nicely with source control systems like SVN. These allow multiple people to work on projects simultaneously, and then commit their work to the master copy (the server) as well as update to receive other people's changes. I've been meaning to write a tutorial on how to set it up...

    Yeah this feature seems pretty essential. I'd love to know how exactly it works.

  • Ashley it would be really cool to see a tutorial about this. And the setup required to use Construct with Tortoise for example.

  • I'm voting for this tutorial as well, even though I have no immediate need for it. I have no idea how to use version control systems, but it'd be nice to include tortoise, svn, git - basically show how it's done in lots of solutions instead of focusing on one.

  • Me too ! That would be awesome !

  • Kyatric I hope for tutorial post for this solution :)

  • It's very easy to use Subversion. You shouldn't need someone to write a tutorial for you. I learned how to use it by myself without even reading a tutorial. I would just Google how to use Subversion and read up about it.

    You can even use Dropbox if you're not patient enough to use it. The merging in Subversion was never perfect either. If you're coordinating the team correctly, you shouldn't need to merge edits of files anyway.

  • Everyone has a different frame of mind that let's able to figure out some concepts better than others. There will certainly be people who need assistance.

    As an example I install and run my own Drupal multisite server. However, there are plenty of people who even given step by step tutorials will still have difficulty. Yet maybe they are far better off at photography and taking good pictures than the skill required for a CMS.

    A tutorial would be a fantastic idea to help people get started and where to look. So yes a tutorial would be a good idea.

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