particle editor

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From the Asset Store
19 glow particle sprites in 4 colors and different shapes.
  • No, it's really 404, check your pms in a few minutes.

    I also recognized, that I interchanged the buttons <img src="smileys/smiley36.gif" border="0" align="middle" />

    S and X for the left thing, D and C for the right ones^^.

  • Really interesting .cap^^ Just like allways if you post something <img src="smileys/smiley36.gif" border="0" align="middle" />

    I'm too curious right now, gonna look more into your cap and combine things^^. Is it possible to move your particles slightly in one direction?

    And how you managed it, that the particles won't "slide" a few cm behind the mouse? Still looking how to turn it on/off xD that slide lol. Really interesting .cap, as I said :P, thanks again for that.

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  • It is possible not only to move the particles slightly, but to do anything you want with them. You have full control over every single particle at every tick.

    The particles don't "slide" because their positions are recalculated on every tick. If you just stop that, they will "slide".

    Here is an example of a fire-like ring:

    customparticles2.cap

    EDIT

    Tip: Hold 'space' and slightly move the mouse to get a burn-in effect.

  • Thank you^^

    Made my day/week/month <img src="smileys/smiley36.gif" border="0" align="middle" />

    Now I will think about the tangential effects.

    After that, a little GUI with sliders and it's perfect^^.

    After all it's worth a sticky maybe <img src="smileys/smiley17.gif" border="0" align="middle" />

    I come with updates if I get anything new.

    Will use your .cap. I could use mine and improve it with your stuff, but I'm lazy and yours is better sorted <img src="smileys/smiley9.gif" border="0" align="middle" />

  • Omg. I should start to math all over again.

    "RGB(clamp(lerp(GetRed(particle('fadetoColor')), GetRed(particle('fadefromColor')), particle('currentcolortime') / particle('colorfadetime')), 0, 255), clamp(lerp(GetGreen(particle('fadetoColor')), GetGreen(particle('fadefromColor')), particle('currentcolortime') / particle('colorfadetime')), 0, 255), clamp(lerp(GetBlue(particle('fadetoColor')), GetBlue(particle('fadefromColor')), particle('currentcolortime') / particle('colorfadetime')), 0, 255))"

    What are you talking about. How did you calculate it :). lerp inside of clamp. Sin, cos, tan. I wish I had listened my math teacher on my collage years.

    Thank you for sharing.

  • At the end, it looks more complicated as it was, when you tought it out <img src="smileys/smiley36.gif" border="0" align="middle">. Can't find that simple sin/cos example so I made a new one. I named the variables how you have to set up the formula if you want to make something circles around^^(x + radius * cos(angle))

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/26932498/umkreisen.cap

  • Omg. I should start to math all over again.

    "RGB(clamp(lerp(GetRed(particle('fadetoColor')), GetRed(particle('fadefromColor')), particle('currentcolortime') / particle('colorfadetime')), 0, 255), clamp(lerp(GetGreen(particle('fadetoColor')), GetGreen(particle('fadefromColor')), particle('currentcolortime') / particle('colorfadetime')), 0, 255), clamp(lerp(GetBlue(particle('fadetoColor')), GetBlue(particle('fadefromColor')), particle('currentcolortime') / particle('colorfadetime')), 0, 255))"

    What are you talking about. How did you calculate it :). lerp inside of clamp. Sin, cos, tan. I wish I had listened my math teacher on my collage years.

    Thank you for sharing.

    You're welcome :)

    But don't get too afraid just of long phrases. It really is simple, as soon as you follow the logic behind it.

    The values of the three color channels are linearily interpolated, so that all three change in the same amount of time. This is what lerp is for. The t-value of lerp ist calculated as a ratio of the total time given to interpolate and the actual time.

    Clamp just serves one purpose: timedelta is constantly substracted from currentcolortime, and so can get negative, which would make the t-value negative also, and the color would continue to change (but in an unwanted way). Something was needed to prevent that the color value will get negative and clamp is one way of doing so. You could also just use max(formula, 0).

    The fun of sin and cos is that they are so easy to use. Just give it an angle and it tells you a position, I love it ;)

    And when used to animate something it also has some kind of built-in deceleration/acceleration. I did go into detail somewhere else, so I won't repeat it, but if you could only learn and use two functions, I'd say go with sin and cos. What you can realize with only those is so versatile.

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