Free trial for Construct 3

  • Yeah, there are a few games you can make with less than 250 events.

    But there are also a lot of games that take more.

  • The real thing is we just don't know the limitations of the free c3... I bought c2 because of the event limitations. But I would not subscribe $ 99 a year for that. My current serious prototype is about 700 events and I will just switch to unity...

  • It's really sad. I actually like the fast paced event type "programming" of construct. But: It's no problem for me to program in c# - im just lazy. But as things come down I will have to switch to a more reliable engine. Plus: you have to train your coding skills which will help you to sustain in the REAL business....

  • I'm a teacher by trade, and I've never had a problem with students going over the 100-event limit in the free version of Construct 2. 100 events is definitely enough to make something fun and playable In the limited amount of time we spend using the software (approximately 1 week of class time).

    The big draw of using Construct 2 is that I can tell my kids that they can go home and fiddle around with it for free as much as the like. If they ever want to do a larger project, they have to pay. Unlimited events is pretty much a useless feature for most of my students, and paying to spend a few hours tinkering is an absolute no-go for them. In the end, I can get kids interested precisely because there is no looming payment hanging over their (read: their parents') head. I can only imagine the angry phone calls I would get if I told parents that they have to pay to do an activity in my class...

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  • I'm a teacher by trade, and I've never had a problem with students going over the 100-event limit in the free version of Construct 2. 100 events is definitely enough to make something fun and playable In the limited amount of time we spend using the software (approximately 1 week of class time).

    The big draw of using Construct 2 is that I can tell my kids that they can go home and fiddle around with it for free as much as the like. If they ever want to do a larger project, they have to pay. Unlimited events is pretty much a useless feature for most of my students, and paying to spend a few hours tinkering is an absolute no-go for them. In the end, I can get kids interested precisely because there is no looming payment hanging over their (read: their parents') head. I can only imagine the angry phone calls I would get if I told parents that they have to pay to do an activity in my class...

    Good point and I think teaching people (kids) to use limited events makes their coding a lot less sloppy and they have to use logic to use events in a way that gets the most out of them instead of using a hundred events to just check sprites and do non essential tasks.

  • Good point and I think teaching people (kids) to use limited events makes their coding a lot less sloppy and they have to use logic to use events in a way that gets the most out of them instead of using a hundred events to just check sprites and do non essential tasks.

    True.

  • Again, for examples limiting your events is great. However, if you want to build complete games, you have to go over the limit. The game demos are over 250 events.

    Imagine if Unity3D had a character limit. People just wouldn't use it.

  • Again, for examples limiting your events is great. However, if you want to build complete games, you have to go over the limit. The game demos are over 250 events.

    Imagine if Unity3D had a character limit. People just wouldn't use it.

    Um no?

    You must be confusing lines of an event with an event.

    The events are numbered and I don't know of any C2 example that goes over 25 events?

  • mammoth

    At first I assumed your ulterior motive for requesting free trial versus limited events was because the format for your udemy guides involved making game projects higher than 100 events. But then I looked at your udemy page and by looking over the games you are training students to make, they would in no way warrant even 30 events, let alone 100. So now I'm puzzled.

    For all the reasons already named in this thread, a free trial is total deal-breaker for my teaching purposes. I'm guessing that other institutions employing semester schedules (read: 16 weeks) would think twice about teaching Construct as well.

    From a personal stand-point, I understand the logic behind free trials, but I disregard free trials whenever I see them. I would rather just watch YouTube videos of the software being used or read comparisons to software on message boards. I often like to download software and try it briefly, putting it on the back burner until I get another chunk of free time to keep trying it, and that can be weeks or months later. I imagine I'm not the only one, especially if I were a student trying out many different engines at the same time over the course of several months.

    Like one of the major problems with software subscriptions, free trials create a sense of pressure in the user to use it "or else." This tension leads to a dissonant user experience. The "or else" should feel positive, not negative, when incentivizing paying for the full version.

  • Just for clarity, we have no plans for a time limited trial of Construct 3. We will still have a free edition with no time limits. Limitations of Construct 3 free edition are still to be published.

  • Every projects I taught to my students are compressed into 100 events in C2.

    Guess what? All there final projects across 100 events, and several teams use more than 500 events.

    Judge a C2 project by its event number is meaningless. But it's really amazing and joyful to launch a student's 500-event project.

  • Minor in C2

    Major in Art

  • Damn I wish I was a better artist!

    Give me some great art and I can write play and mechanics to make it look and play well but doing game art is just not my talent. Unless it is drafting and I can do drafted mechanical and structural drawings no problem.

    I think it is a left brain right brain thing?

  • I kind of agree with OP. Even though Tom mentioned not considering it, I'm sure they will work out a solid plan.

    Considering they moved C3 online, the last thing you want is a ton of free users using up bandwidth and data for extended periods of time. Each free user is going to be a cost for scirra as long as they can use C3 online, no matter how much they limit functionality.

    If you only limit exports. A person can use C3 for years producing a bunch complete games, then just paying when they are done = Really bad business decision. Especially since they mentioned that you are able to earn money on your games even after licence expired.

    If you limit events, Families, Layers and other stuff like C2, I think. it's still going to be costly in the long run as long as people access the tool online.

    For me a free version should be like a tryout, get a hang of it, tinker with it, play around. If you like it... then pay for it. 30 day trial seems like a sensible option though But I'm sure they thought about it. From a purely business perspective, the last thing you want is people to abuse the Free version, and stealing bandwidth, stability, server performance, etc from paying customers, using it for months or years without paying.

  • Are sub event lines not considered an event line for the limit?

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