No Programming Required!???

  • "Computer programming (often shortened to programming) is a process that leads from an original formulation of a computing problem to executable computer programs." - Some Wikipedia thing .

    You never, ever, EVER, do that when you are making games in Construct 2.... EVER!!

    When i make a game, it just flows from my soul, into the keyboard. No need for flowcharts, or designing software. I just close my eyes and it all just happens. I drink my coffee and the universe empowers me.

    Construct 2 makes this all possible. I never program... ever.

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  • I've made numerous construct games with no coding.... Can't really see OPs point of view. Kind of seems like OP is stuck, upset, or thought he code make a game like halo overnight.

    You need to start small and work your way up. I'm sure you did not master making assets overnight. Construct is no different. Flappy bird you can make in minutes, but more advanced games take learning. No programming does not mean no learning required.

  • I've programmed for years, on mainframes, on unix boxes, and on windows platforms... C,C++,BASIC, FORTRAN, etc...

    I consider C2 coding.. high level, but it's still coding.

    you have to understand basic coding structure and practices. You have to understand the concept of a game loop. If you don't understand then sure you can make very basic games but you will have a difficulty doing anything advanced.

    C2 will turn you into a coder, so have patience and have fun!

  • C2 will turn you into a coder, so have patience and have fun!

    Very true.

    After years of struggling with a few flavors of BASIC, pascal, python, and Logo (lol) . I finally came a cross C2. There was no "Hello world" to start out and that was what really hooked me.

    I got brave and learned C#, and now C2 is even easier for me. The else statements make much more sense. The function return values where no longer a mystery. I can read a theory on stackOverflow.com and apply it to both C2 and Unity.

    It is sort of ironic it is marketed as something that would prevent anyone from coding, yet it makes the non-coders want to code. It makes the code a little more De-Coded, if that makes any sense.

    I suggest this to anyone who has had problems with learning programming in the past. It will keep them interested enough to keep on learning and trying.

    i dont think anyone really took the "Games without programming" thing serious. i know I did not. It is just common sense. Computers do not have telepathy to get my ideas yet.

  • Well, I knew no programming whatsoever when I started. And I've made some fun stuff, simple, but fun, more than just flappy stuff. Construct has actually helped teach me how some programming works, logically.

  • It is sort of ironic it is marketed as something that would prevent anyone from coding, yet it makes the non-coders want to code. It makes the code a little more De-Coded, if that makes any sense.

    Very, very true!

    In fact, I find it strange because this is its best feature and is advertised as the opposite! It's a tool just like the modern IDEs are, compared to the plain text editors people used to write programs on. Yeah, I know it's not a programming language, but what's the point? Those IDEs with their intellisense and debuggers and whatnot, did help the programmers make the transfer from an idea in their head to something that works, easier. Isn't that what C2 does already?

  • At it's core, programming relates to logic. You tell the computer to do something based on conditions, if, else, loops, triggers etc.

    Traditional programming involves typing out instructions manually in that specific language's syntax.

    C2 bypasses this and replaces the manual typing of text with its event system. But it is still logic. It still requires you to think like a programmer. The difference is instead of learning C# or C+, you are learning "C2's event language", which is a lot easier to learn for most people (myself included, who have learnt Java before moving to C2).

    If you want to make a complex game, you have to understand C2's language very well. Like anything in life, to understand it well, one must learn.

  • At it's core, programming relates to logic. You tell the computer to do something based on conditions, if, else, loops, triggers etc.

    Traditional programming involves typing out instructions manually in that specific language's syntax.

    C2 bypasses this and replaces the manual typing of text with its event system. But it is still logic. It still requires you to think like a programmer. The difference is instead of learning C# or C+, you are learning "C2's event language", which is a lot easier to learn for most people (myself included, who have learnt Java before moving to C2).

    If you want to make a complex game, you have to understand C2's language very well. Like anything in life, to understand it well, one must learn.

    +infinity

  • At it's core, programming relates to logic. You tell the computer to do something based on conditions, if, else, loops, triggers etc.

    Traditional programming involves typing out instructions manually in that specific language's syntax.

    C2 bypasses this and replaces the manual typing of text with its event system. But it is still logic. It still requires you to think like a programmer. The difference is instead of learning C# or C+, you are learning "C2's event language", which is a lot easier to learn for most people (myself included, who have learnt Java before moving to C2).

    If you want to make a complex game, you have to understand C2's language very well. Like anything in life, to understand it well, one must learn.

    Well said.

  • I have to be honest and admit I fell for the "no programming required" line too.

    I'm not blaming Scirra, I really should have known better but alas no.

  • At it's core, programming relates to logic. You tell the computer to do something based on conditions, if, else, loops, triggers etc.

    Traditional programming involves typing out instructions manually in that specific language's syntax.

    C2 bypasses this and replaces the manual typing of text with its event system. But it is still logic. It still requires you to think like a programmer. The difference is instead of learning C# or C+, you are learning "C2's event language", which is a lot easier to learn for most people (myself included, who have learnt Java before moving to C2).

    If you want to make a complex game, you have to understand C2's language very well. Like anything in life, to understand it well, one must learn.

    Give this man a cookie +1

  • Shanetastic if out there is a game engine than i can throw all the assets and wiring a usb from the pc to my mind it processes my thoughts of how the game i want to make should construct from the begining please i want this program..maybe in 2 decades or more (who knows technology is a continuously evolving beast...) until then lets be realistic. no programming required is right. you have a differnt way to approach logic in a game than to know c or javascript. i dont know how to program and when i start trying to learn the "im too old for this sh!* " totaly embrace me mentaly...the way c2 gives you the chance to make things for a non coder is something that i think you will never find easier. try to read tutorials watching videos and ask for help here for specific problems. after 3 years of using i dont make any game really only projects still in alpha. but from the beggining now im more sure for what im doing..i learned a lot and still learning...patience mate and work without these sorry but there is nothing to do

  • I definitely think that C2 helps train your brain to think logically. I can't code, sadly - I've tried to learn, but a combination of mind-numbing tutorials that don't show you how to do anything useful, and a mind that bends more towards artistic creation has meant that I've failed miserably each time. However, I do get the idea behind coding, and using e-learning creation software has helped mould my brainwaves to use variables and conditions more constructively.

    With that in mind, coming to C2 a few weeks ago was a revelation. I could build things with logical statements, without having to understand a stupid (to my mind) syntax. And what's even better, I could make things that were fun instead of a 'Hello World', or a function that multiplied two numbers or listed a bunch of different types of fruit stored in an array. And you know what? The best things come when there's something that I don't immediately get. If I have a problem and have to solve it, I think more creatively. For instance, I was trying to think how I could make a sprite that rotated around a pivot in the centre of the screen. For about ten minutes I was stumped, looking at setting angle to self.Angle+1 and similar things, before it occurred to me that all I had to do was pin the sprite to an invisible sprite in the middle of the screen and rotate the latter on keypress instead. Hey presto - it did exactly what I wanted it to, and I was delighted that I'd worked it out.

    It's almost like a game in itself. Without hyperbole, I think it's the most fantastic and usable piece of software I own, and the possibilities are limited only by your imagination. This should be in every single school. Imagine what the next generation of creative minds could come up with using it.

    Anyway, that's my long and rambling take on it. I see it as coding without having to use the language of code, but not as dumbed down as something like Scratch. I have no qualms about using C2's building blocks - I don't program synth sounds from scratch every time, and I'm happy to use filters and effects in Illustrator or Photoshop, so I don't really see a difference there.

  • This should be in every single school. Imagine what the next generation of creative minds could come up with using it.

    Working on it

  • He he, me too - my sister-in-law and her husband both work in schools!

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