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Why buy better C2 licenses so we can to sell our games?

  • I know I enjoy making free games and am pretty young, but I saving up for a laptop and won't make enough money in one year and I don't wan't to wait that long. So, why should I have to pay to sell my games? I don't have enough to afford a better license. So why should I have to?

  • I guess you could just go learn how to code and make your own tools for game development.

  • I know some coding, but I don't enjoy coding.

  • If you want to make free games and have enough with C2's free version, than no need to buy a license for now.

    If at some point you want to go past the limits of the free version or go into a more "commercial" way with your games or even support the development of C2, then you can/have to buy the license.

    If your question is "why pay for a license to sell your games", it's because C2's free version doesn't allow you to sell those games, and you put yourself at risk of legal troubles that would cost far more than a license or even a new laptop if you were to try to sell games made with the free version.

  • SayShhh So you want to make money off your games, but assume the people who make Construct 2 shouldn't make money off the tools they created? So if the people who play your games say I am saving up for an Xbox, I don't want to pay for your game so why should I? You are going to be OK with that?

  • SayShhh Do you realize that you come off as very rude and entitled here?

    Are you joking? You want to sell your games (and expect to make over $5000 doing so). One game creation engine helped you along the way, and you paid a measly 50-100 bucks for it. The software is that price, but the license to use the software to sell commercially successful games is higher.

    CryEngine takes 30% of your sales. Every sale. Ever. Unity requires an investment of like $5000 just to unlock all the features and export options. UDK isn't much kinder than CryEngine. Even Game Maker, a similar engine to C2, chargest a minimum of $99 per export. Their native export option costs $300. Stencyl won't sell you the rights to sell your own games. They RENT them to you on a year-to-year basis.

    This should be a thread thanking Scirra for being so generous with their licensing. Shameful.

  • I know I enjoy making free games and am pretty young, but I saving up for a laptop and won't make enough money in one year and I don't wan't to wait that long. So, why should I have to pay to sell my games? I don't have enough to afford a better license. So why should I have to?

    Lol, a Construct 2 license is the cheapest part of selling your games. It costs peanuts in comparison to other expenses encured in the sale of games and generation of income.

    You are pretty young, stay a hobbyist and get your skill levels up. When you are making great little games that attract interest, then think about progressing.

    But a C2 license is last of your worries when trying to make an income

  • Hmmh.. These kids these days. I wonder how many of them would have guts to make a game with C64 or Sinclair spectrum?

  • Hmmh.. These kids these days. I wonder how many of them would have guts to make a game with C64 or Sinclair spectrum?

    Or making games in basic whit one msx hitbit p20 hehe nice flashback lol

  • > Hmmh.. These kids these days. I wonder how many of them would have guts to make a game with C64 or Sinclair spectrum?

    >

    Or making games in basic whit one msx hitbit p20 hehe nice flashback lol

    Oh, yeah basic, that was hard. real hard. And sooooooooo, much time.

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  • Ah, spending rainy lunchtimes at primary school copying out routines in BASIC from a big red book, on a BBC Micro. Good times!

  • Oh, yeah basic, that was hard. real hard. And sooooooooo, much time.

    Basic is quite easy.. Well, unless you want to do things like gfx or music in C64 (oh the glorious Poke)..

    It was quite a steep step to start making machine code routines. with pokes + sys command. In the end, I'm happy that is no longer necessary.

  • This thread has turn nostalgic mode ON

  • >

    > Oh, yeah basic, that was hard. real hard. And sooooooooo, much time.

    >

    Basic is quite easy.. Well, unless you want to do things like gfx or music in C64 (oh the glorious Poke)..

    It was quite a steep step to start making machine code routines. with pokes + sys command. In the end, I'm happy that is no longer necessary.

    It was when I was at school. Started making little games when I was 8, 9, 10 and it was long, hard, work with no instant gratification of a completed game. (I had no money to buy games, and games were scarce anyways, so decided to make my own)

    I used something else too, but for the life of me, can't remember what language it was.

    Fun days those.

  • Or writing machine code for the motorola 6800

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