Krita or Inkscape?

  • I am confused.

    I have ArtRage, Krita and Inkscape.

    I have had ArtRage for a long time but stopped using it.

    Now I am wanting to make my own sprites and do not really know what I am doing for sure.

    Any advice? I really don't want to buy assets.

    Ken

  • The first thing you have to do is to choose which software will you use to make game art!

  • I forgot to ask the main question.

    What is the difference between them?

    Is one better than the other for making sprites?

  • all depend if you want to do sprites like cartoons / vector quality, INKSCAPE, if you need to create landscapes for your levels use krita; but the best is Photoshop

  • I have been reading a book on Krita and it looks like I will be using that.

    I have a very old copy of Photoshop from 1999 that I may use. I also have Spriter to make animations.

    Now I need to live long enough to learn these and decide how I want the game to look.

    I think there is a long road ahead.

    To answer your first question, I am not quitting, just taking a detour again.

    Ken

    ( If you are wondering about the age reference, I am 75 and not in the best physical condition.)

  • I forgot to say Thanks for the help.

    Ken

  • Combine inkscape + spriter pro

    I do so

  • Krita now has animation tools also which is a big big plus. Not only that but it is pretty similar to Photoshop and it is free. The animation tools in Krita however are simpler to use than those in Photoshop.

  • I have pretty much decided after this discussion and reading some of the Krita book to go with Krita, Spriter and Construct2.

    That gives me 3 programs to learn.

    Thanks for giving my thoughts some validity.

    Ken

  • uh inkscape is vector editor and Krita raster. They are different beasts and you cant really compare them.

    Illustrator = inkscape

    PS = Krita/Gimp/PDN

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  • As for which software to pick, ultimately the best tool for the job is the one you have at your disposal and are comfortable using. My recommendation is try different software for a few hours and pick the ones you most like working with (that get the job done).

    Just a tip if anyone needs Photoshop and doesn't have a license, Adobe has released Photoshop CS2 version for free (and also CS2 versions of other Creative Suite programs like Illustrator, Audition and After Effects). While quite old, it has all the essential features and is capable of achieving pretty much anything you need in making 2D game graphics.

    http://www.redmondpie.com/download-adob ... still-can/

  • AdiJager is correct: it is best to combine Krita and InkScape in your asset generation workflow. Sometimes vectors work better, and at other times a bitmap-oriented approach (Krita) will work best. And there is nothing against combining the two, and relying on their respective strengths.

    And Gimp is often used as well for certain tasks.

    To learn more about InkScape and game art, why not check out the "game art for programmers" blog:

    http://www.2dgameartguru.com/

  • In my opinion if you are after vector art in games I would go for Flash since animation is possible there with certain ease regarding the timeline (unfortunately not free, but there are monthly installments possible - although there is a trial available for testing purposes). For raster animation - Krita Def.

  • In my opinion if you are after vector art in games I would go for Flash since animation is possible there with certain ease regarding the timeline (unfortunately not free, but there are monthly installments possible - although there is a trial available for testing purposes). For raster animation - Krita Def.

    Keeping vector graphics vector in games is generally much too slow - so those will have to be converted to bitmap elements anyway.

    Flash is an okay animation tool for character animation: Anime Studio is far more evolved for that type of work (and inexpensive compared for the regular non-pro version). If the game engine supports cut-out animation tools, then either Spriter or Spine offer a superior pipeline and workflow.

    Everything really depends on the game graphic style you decide on in the initial game design stage. Only then should you decide on the tool(s) you will use.

  • The program a person uses is based firstly on two major factors:

    1) Budget available - free or commercial? How much is there to spend?

    2) Deadline - if tight schedule stick to what you know, instead of learning new software.

    Only then is the style considered. If the style is considered first, it may have to be changed after considering the answers to the two questions above.

    As for the style, there are 3 main aspects to consider (focusing on 2D drawn here, and not 3D prerendered animation sequences or photographed stop motion, however a combination of the two can be used in cutout animation as well) is between frame by frame animation, cut-out animation (tweening) or a blend of both.

    You can go for cutout animation in Flash as well frame by frame, or Photoshop and After Effects combined for example as both together work good for cutout.

    Some folks even go for Flash and After Effects.

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