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The Linux Situation

  • So as I'm getting closer to release, I'm getting more nervous about the linux situation - more specifically, Node-Webkit's Linux export. From what I've heard, it simply doesn't work on the majority of linux machines. Is this true or am I misinformed?

    If this is true, something really needs to be done about it as more 'big games' are made with C2. Linux is a small market but they are a passionate community and I cannot continue advertising my game as being linux compatible if it simply doesn't work.

    Is something being done about this issue? Or am I simply misinformed and Linux NW export works fine?

    Thanks!

  • Well to be honest i have had no luck at all with node on any version of Linux. Unfortunately i have no idea what the problems are or how to fix them

  • I have managed to get my C2 nodewebkit exported game to run on modern distros (tested against Arch at the moment).

    It is however not something you would do with stuff that actually gets deployed to customers.

    The problem with nodewebkit right now is, that it is built against a rather old set of libs, the main culprit being libudev. Unlike windows, most linux distros do not allow system-wide installs of "older" libs, you just have the one you got along with the distro or from the repository. Typically this isn't a problem, since all open source software that ships with a distro is built against their current set of libs.

    The versions of the lib in question do not differ that much, so it seems.. so you can run a binary built against the older with the newer lib, if you

    1. Make a symlink on your specific system from the new libname to the old one (not recommended, and cannot be imposed upon customers) or:

    2. Make a local symlink in the users homedir to not taint the whole system and use the ld_preload mechanism in a wrapper script to enforce the local symlink being used for the lib (not recommended either), or:

    3. Patch the nw generated binary with "sed", to look for the other name, as explained here in the last paragraph: https://github.com/rogerwang/node-webki ... budev.so.0

    This is a very dirty hack though. All kinds of stuff can go wrong with that, even though it seemingly works (set off virus scanners, for example). I used the last method to get my stuff running.

    In the end: Nodewebkit needs to get their shit together and support modern distros. Until then, you cannot in good conscience deploy to Linux for end customers, you will get swamped with support whining.

  • Sounds disappointing.

  • Yes indeed, this is very disappointing. Scirra really should be looking into this...

  • Yes indeed, this is very disappointing. Scirra really should be looking into this...

    There's hope, that now with the store, someone will write a proper wrappers. It's so stressful working on something, most often a dream project, and not being sure if when its done it will even work.

  • newt Linux is a considerably higher portion of the gaming market. It's not a question that Linux is worthwhile especially since Valve has embraced it as 'The future of gaming'.

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  • i am not sure that Scirra can do much about it if its a Node issue but then there seems no point in exporting to Linux either until it works.

  • I keep looking for a survey of users that also dual boot Windows.

    I suspect its at least in the 90's.

    Surely you have better things to worry about.

    For all you know a substitute for Node-Webkit could show up any time, and its not like a web version is not viable.

  • A web version is not viable for a variety of reasons, Steam being the main one.

    There are of course better things to worry about, but you seem to be the only one who thinks it's not a concern.

    For instance, Humble Bundle won't even take your game if it doesn't support Linux. There's definitely demand there.

  • The hardcore Linux users( which you pretty much have to be if you are a regular user ) will usually find a way.

    Hell I got it to work on a really old pc using an offshoot of Ubunto, and I'm a novice at best.

    Also don't forget there are more flavors than Baskin Robins, and most can switch between those with ease.

    Oh, and dont forget Wine, has anyone tried Wine?

  • The hardcore Linux users( which you pretty much have to be if you are a regular user ) will usually find a way.

    Hell I got it to work on a really old pc using an offshoot of Ubunto, and I'm a novice at best.

    Also don't forget there are more flavors than Baskin Robins, and most can switch between those with ease.

    Oh, and dont forget Wine, has anyone tried Wine?

    Linux users aren't second class citizens, the responsibility of "finding a way" lies with the developer if they want to claim Linux support, for anything but the most basic levels of proficiency by the end user. Wine doesn't count as "Linux support".

    In addition, Linux represents a bigger market than mac, as well as being a prerequisite for many marketplaces, such as the IndieBundle, mentioned by the OP.

  • Luckily they can pick a distro it does work on, and BOOM... Linux support.

    BTW I think you can throw out the "second class citizens" part when you start talking about proficiency having anything to do with it.

    I say that as "finding a way" is the only way for the novice Linux user.

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